ADHD

ADHD

ADHD, or Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, is a neurodevelopmental disorder which often begins in childhood. Symptoms of ADHD can include trouble focusing, impulsive behavior, hyperactivity, frequent daydreaming and fidgeting. ADHD symptoms can last through adulthood, though symptoms related to hyperactivity tend to decrease. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that over 6 million children in the United States have been diagnosed with ADHD as of 2016. The rate of ADHD diagnoses for boys is twice that of girls.

 

There is no single test that can diagnose ADHD. A diagnosis requires a comprehensive evaluation, which can be performed by a licensed clinician with expertise in ADHD.

 

ADHD can be managed and treated through behavioral treatment, medication or a combination of the two. According to the CDC, about three in four children with ADHD in the United States receive treatment. Of these, almost half received behavioral treatment, and more than half were taking ADHD medication. School support has been strong, with almost 9 out of 10 children with ADHD receiving accommodations. Additionally, many children diagnosed with ADHD also have other disorders, including behavioral/conduct problems, anxiety, depression or autism spectrum disorder.

 

North Shore Child & Family Guidance Center offers comprehensive diagnostic assessments by highly qualified teams of caring psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers and mental health counselors with special expertise in diagnosing and treating children. Our Learning to Learn Center offers specialized screening, diagnosis and tutoring for children suspected of having learning and attention deficit problems and developmental disorders. For more information about our services, please call us at 516-626-1971.

 

Related programs and services:

Learning to Learn Center

Diagnostic Services

 

Read more on our blog:

The ABCs of ADHD

 

Sources:

CDC: What is ADHD?

CDC: Data and Statistics About ADHD

Alcohol – Substance Use

Alcohol and Substance Use

Alcohol and substance use have direct connections to mental health, especially for children and teenagers. Alcohol, tobacco and marijuana are the most common substances used by teenagers. Substance use can affect the brain development of children and teenagers, which can have lasting effects into adulthood. Substance use is also associated with risky or unsafe behaviors. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the younger someone is when they begin using these substances, the higher the chances are that they will continue to use these substances or become addicted in adulthood.

 

Substance use is more likely among teenagers who have mental health disorders such as anxiety or depression. Additionally, substance use can aggravate the symptoms of these disorders. The Child Mind Institute reports that these substances can temporarily alleviate the symptoms of these disorders since they affect the brain regions involved in the disorders, but it also leads the teenagers to feel even worse without the substances.

 

Drug and alcohol treatment and prevention services are provided for adolescents, young children ages 6-24, and their families at the Guidance Center’s Leeds Place – Serving Young People in Westbury. Substance use services include counseling youths who are alcohol and drug users, children who live in families with a parent who is suffering from alcoholism or drug addiction and youths who have co-occurring chemical dependency and mental health problems. Prevention services are also offered to local school districts. For more information about our services, please call us at 516-626-1971.

 

Related programs and services:

Adolescent Outpatient Chemical Dependency Treatment

 

Read more in our blog:

How to Talk to Your Kids About Drugs

Kratom: A Drug Parents Should Know About

How Kids are Affected by the Drug Epidemic

 

Sources:

Child Mind Institute: Mental Health Disorders and Teen Substance Use

CDC: Teen Substance Use & Risks

Anxiety

Anxiety

Anxiety disorders go beyond typical fears and worries that children or teenagers experience while growing up. The five major types of anxiety disorders are generalized anxiety disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), panic disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and social anxiety disorder. Though symptoms vary with each type of anxiety disorder, children who suffer from anxiety tend to experience fear, nervousness, shyness and avoidance.

 

According to the National Institutes of Health, nearly one-third of adolescents ages 13 to 18 years old will experience an anxiety disorder. Rates of anxiety in children and teenagers have been on the rise in recent years, but research has shown that they are not receiving the treatment that they need. Anxiety disorders are highly treatable. The most common treatments include cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and SSRI medications, such as prescribed antidepressants.

 

At all three sites of North Shore Child & Family Guidance Center, mental health services are offered for children from birth through age 24 and their families. These services include comprehensive evaluation, an individually tailored treatment plan that may include any combination of individual, family and group therapy, and, when indicated, medication management from a psychiatrist. All treatment plans require family consent and participation. For more information about our services, please call us at 516-626-1971.

 

Read more in our blog:

Helping Your Children Manage Stress

The Facts About OCD

Soothing Your Anxious Child

 

Sources:

CDC: Anxiety and Depression in Children

HHS: What are the five major types of anxiety disorders?

ADAA: Children and Teens

NIMH: Anxiety Disorder Statistics

Autism

Autism

Autism Spectrum Disorder, or ASD, is a developmental disability that contributes to challenges in socializing, communication and behavior. Children and teenagers with ASD may communicate, interact, behave and learn in different ways than is typical of most children and teenagers. ASD is a diagnostic term used for conditions that were previously diagnosed separately: pervasive development disorder not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS) and Asperger syndrome. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, approximately 1 in 54 children have been identified with ASD in the United States. ASD is four times more common in boys than it is in girls.

 

Research has indicated that the autism population faces a higher mortality risk than the general population, with drowning among the leading causes of death. Additionally, children with ASD face higher rates of bullying from peers, as well as sexual abuse, compared to the general population.

 

There is no single diagnostic test for ASD. Medical professionals can make a diagnosis based upon behavior. A diagnosis of ASD by the age of two is typically reliable, but some children may not receive a final diagnosis until they are older. Though there is no single cure for ASD, many intervention treatments services have been demonstrated as effective in improving the development of a child diagnosed with ASD. Early intervention is crucial.

 

Families with young children with ASD may benefit from early childhood services at the Marks Family Right from the Start 0-3+ Center (RFTS) in Manhasset. RFTS offers parent education as well as therapeutic and support services for young children. North Shore Child & Family Guidance Center also offers the Grandparent Advocates Supporting Autistic Kids (GASAK) program, a monthly meeting of grandparents to support, inform and advocate for families with autistic children.  For more information about our services for both young children and for teens, please call us at 516-626-1971.

 

Related programs:

Grandparent Advocates Supporting Autistics Kids (GASAK)

 

Read more in our blog:

Autism Awareness

Support for Grandparents

 

Sources:

CDC: Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)

NAA: Autism & Safety Facts

Bereavement

Bereavement

 

Bereavement refers to the state of loss that follows the death of a loved one. This state can be expressed in a multitude of symptoms, including trouble sleeping, a loss of appetite, anger, guilt, mood swings and lower productivity.

 

Children and teenagers experiencing bereavement often grieve differently than adults. The American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry lists several signs that a child may be having serious issues after a loss, such as an extended loss of interest in activities, acting younger for an extended period of time, withdrawal from friends, repeated statements of wanting to join the late loved one, decrease in school performance, school refusal or repeated imitation of the late loved one.

 

It is incredibly important that children and teenagers struggling with bereavement seek mental health assistance if necessary. The Lucille and Martin E. Kantor Bereavement and Trauma Center in Roslyn Heights offers assistance to children, youths and their families during times of grief and trauma, including parents of murder victims and other homicide survivors (POMV).  For more information about our services, please call us at 516-626-1971.

 

Related programs:

The Schnurmacher Bereavement & Trauma Program

Lucille and Martin E. Kantor Bereavement and Trauma Center

 

Sources:

Psychology Today: Bereavement

AACAP: Grief and Children

Bullying

Bullying

Bullying is an unfortunately common experience for children and teenagers. According to the American Society for the Positive Care of Children, about one in three students have been bullied at school. Bullying can take many different forms, such as verbal threats, physical attacks, spreading rumors, and social exclusion. In the age of social media, cyberbullying is becoming more common as a form of bullying. Cyberbullying might include sending harassing messages or posting embarrassing photos of someone.

 

Middle school students report the highest incidence of bullying. Some children and teenagers may be more vulnerable to bullying than others. This may be due perceived differences from their peers, being seen as “less popular,” or having low self-esteem. Some students may become targets of bullies because of their race, sexual orientation, gender identity or disability as well. LGBTQ+ students are at an especially high risk for bullying.

 

Bullying can have a detrimental impact on the mental health and well-being of children and teenagers. Research has shown that children and teenagers who are bullied are more likely to experience depression, anxiety and low self-esteem than non-bullied peers. Because of heightened rates of depression and anxiety, bullied children and teenagers may be more susceptible to suicidal thoughts or behavior.

 

Children and teenagers who have experienced bullying and are experiencing mental health issues should take advantage of the mental health services at North Shore Child & Family Guidance Center. These services include comprehensive evaluation, an individually tailored treatment plan that may include any combination of individual, family, and group therapy, and, when indicated, medication management from a psychiatrist. All treatment plans require family consent and participation. For more information about our services, please call us at 516-626-1971.

 

Read more on our blog:

Stopping Bullies in Their Tracks

Stand Up Against Bullying

Stomp Out Bullying

 

Sources:

StopBullying.gov

CDC: The Relationship Between Bullying and Suicide

Chronic Illness

Chronic Illnesses

 

Chronic illnesses can be incredibly challenging for children and teenagers. Research has noted that suffering from a chronic illness can contribute to a higher risk for certain mental health conditions. Children who suffer from chronic illness are more likely to suffer from depression or anxiety, with this susceptibility lasting through adulthood.

 

Depression can be treated, even while suffering from a chronic illness. Mental health services such as therapy or prescribed medications can contribute to improvement.

 

Mental health services are offered for children from birth through age 24 and their families at all three sites of North Shore Child & Family Guidance Center. These services include comprehensive evaluation, an individually tailored treatment plan that may include any combination of individual, family, and group therapy, and, when indicated, medication management from a psychiatrist. All treatment plans require family consent and participation. For more information about our services, please call us at 516-626-1971.

 

Sources:

NIMH: Chronic Illness & Mental Health

Depression

Depression

 

Depression, or major depressive disorder, is a medical illness that differs from typical feelings of sadness. Symptoms of depression may include low self-esteem, feeling tired, inability to feel joy, increased irritability or anger, substance abuse, suicidal thoughts, frequent crying, withdrawal from friends and family, changes in school performance, sleeping more than usual and loss of interest in usual activities.

 

Older children and teenagers are more likely to be diagnosed with depression than younger children. According to the Pew Research Center, approximately 3.2 million teenagers ages 12 to 17 experienced at least one major depressive episode in 2017. Girls are more likely to have depression, and receive treatment, than boys.

 

If your child or teenager appears to be displaying symptoms of depression, it is crucial to act quickly in seeking treatment. Some children and teenagers struggling with depression may consider suicide. Suicide is among the leading causes of death for Americans ages 10 to 24. Depression can be treated through psychotherapy, medication or a combination of both.

 

Mental health services are offered for children from birth through age 24 and their families at all three sites of North Shore Child & Family Guidance Center. These services include comprehensive evaluation, an individually tailored treatment plan that may include any combination of individual, family and group therapy, and, when indicated, medication management from a psychiatrist. All treatment plans require family consent and participation. Additionally, the Latina Girls Project offers bilingual and bicultural mental health counseling as well as outings for adolescent girls suffering from depression. For more information about our services, please call us at 516-626-1971.

 

National Resources:

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1-800-273-8255

Crisis Text Line: Text “HOME” to 741741

In an emergency, call 911.

 

Related programs:

Latina Girls Project

The Fay J. Lindner Foundation Triage and Emergency Services

The Douglas S. Feldman Suicide Prevention Project

 

Read more in our blog:

Is its Normal Blues or Clinical Depression?

Recognizing Depression in Your Adolescent

Guidance Center Expands Suicide Prevention Efforts

Recognizing the Risks of Suicide

Suicidal Thinking in Young People: Know the Signs

 

Sources:

Mayo Clinic: Teen Depression – Symptoms and Causes

CDC: Anxiety and Depression in Children

Pew Research: Depression is increasing among US teens

Developmental Delays

Developmental Delays

 

Developmental delays refer to a group of conditions resulting from an impairment in physical, learning, language or behavioral areas. They begin during the developmental period in childhood, can impact daily functioning, and typically last into adulthood. Most delays are noted when a child fails to reach developmental milestones, such as walking or speaking, around the expected age. Some common developmental disabilities include ADHD, autism spectrum disorder (ASD), cerebral palsy, hearing loss and learning disabilities.

 

Between 2009 and 2017, about one in six children ages 3 to 17 years old were diagnosed with a developmental disability. Diagnosis of developmental disabilities has increased from 2011 to 2017. Research has also indicated that children with developmental disorders are at a greater risk of developing mental health conditions. 

 

North Shore Child & Family Guidance Center offers comprehensive diagnostics assessments by highly qualified teams of caring psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers and mental health counselors with special expertise in diagnosing and treating children. Our Learning to Learn Center offers specialized screening, diagnosis and tutoring for children suspected of having learning and attention deficit problems and developmental disorders. For more information about our services, please call us at 516-626-1971.

 

Related Programs:

Learning to Learn Center

 

Sources:

CDC: Developmental Disabilities

Eating Disorders

Eating Disorders

Eating disorders are serious conditions that affect a person’s eating behaviors and related thoughts and emotions. There are many different types of eating disorders, but the most common are anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and binge-eating disorder.

 

Anorexia nervosa symptoms may include extremely restricted eating, emaciation, distorted body image and an intense fear of gaining weight. Bulimia nervosa often consists of frequent and recurring episodes of eating large amounts of food followed by compensatory behaviors such as forced vomiting, use of laxatives or diuretics, fasting or excessive exercise. Symptoms of binge-eating disorder may include eating when you are not hungry, eating quickly, eating alone or in secret, feeling intense guilt about eating and obesity.

 

Eating disorders appear most frequently during adolescence or young adulthood. Rates are higher among females than males. Those with eating disorders are at an increased risk of suicide and medical complications. Eating disorders have the highest rate of mortality of any mental illness. If your child or teenager is suffering from an eating disorder, do not hesitate to seek help.

 

Mental health services are offered for children from birth through age 24 and their families at all three sites of North Shore Child & Family Guidance Center. These services include comprehensive evaluation, an individually tailored treatment plan that may include any combination of individual, family and group therapy, and, when indicated, medication management from a psychiatrist. All treatment plans require family consent and participation. For more information about our services, please call us at 516-626-1971.

 

Read more on our blog:

The Obsession with Being Thin

Talking About Weight with your Kids

A Loving Way to Discuss Weight

A Weighty Issue

 

Sources:

NIMH: Eating Disorders

Statistics & Research on Eating Disorders

Mayo Clinic: Eating Disorders

ANAD: Eating Disorder Statistics

Learning Disabilities

Learning Disabilities

 

Learning disabilities can contribute to many difficulties for children and teenagers in school. Though learning disabilities and disorders can be difficult to classify, some of the most common disorders include dyslexia (difficulty with reading), dyscalculia (difficulty with math) and dysgraphia (difficulty with writing). Dyslexia is the most common, with over 2 million children in the United States receiving special education services for a reading disorder.

 

Children and teenagers with learning disabilities often need specific accommodations or extra help in school. The Individuals with Disabilities in Education Act (IDEA) ensures that children with learning disabilities are eligible for special education services or accommodations at school. If your child has a learning disability, contact their school about available accommodations and assistance.

 

North Shore Child & Family Guidance Center offers comprehensive diagnostics assessments by highly qualified teams of caring psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers, and mental health counselors with special expertise in diagnosing and treating children. Our Learning to Learn Center offers specialized screening, diagnosis, and tutoring for children suspected of having learning and attention deficit problems and developmental disorders. For more information about our services, please call us at 516-626-1971.

 

Related Programs:

Learning to Learn Center

 

Sources:

CDC: Learning Disorders in Children

Learning Problems in Teens

LGBTQ Issues

LGTBQ Issues

LGTBQ is an acronym used to represent different sexual and gender identities. LGBTQ stands for Lesbian (a woman attracted other women), Gay (a man/woman who is attracted to other men/women, respectively), Bisexual (someone who is attracted to both men and women), Transgender (a person whose gender identity does not correspond with their birth sex), Queer (an umbrella term for someone in the LGBTQ community) and Questioning (someone who is questioning their sexual or gender identity). LGTBQ is sometimes written with a plus sign at the end, representing other sexualities and gender identities, including pansexual, polyamorous, non-binary, and more.

 

LGBTQ youth are at a higher risk for mental health issues than their non-LGBTQ identifying peers due to stigma and discrimination against their sexual or gender identities. Research has indicated that LGBTQ youth are more likely to suffer from depression, and LGBTQ youth are four times more likely to seriously consider suicide than their peers.

 

Studies have also demonstrated the positive impact that supportive home and school environments can have on LGBTQ youth mental health. Strong family bonds, safe schools and supportive adults can protect against depression and suicidal ideation in LGBTQ youth.

 

North Shore Child & Family Guidance Center offers a safe space of LGBTQ struggling with mental health issues and other difficulties related to their sexual or gender identity.  The Guidance Center provides a combination of individual, family and group therapy for children, adolescents and young adults struggling with emotional, social or family issues related to their sexual orientation or gender identity. For more information about our services, please call us at 516-626-1971.

 

National Resources:

Trevor Project Lifeline: 1-866-488-7386

 

Read more in our blog:

Sexuality ‘Cheat Sheet’

He Said, She Said, They Said: A Look at Gender

Supporting LGBTQ Youth

A Welcoming Space for LGBTQ Clients

 

Sources:

HRC: Mental Health and the LGBTQ Community

Perinatal Mood & Anxiety Disorders

Perinatal Mood and Anxiety Disorders

Perinatal mood and anxiety disorders refer to a group of mental health conditions that occur during pregnancy and the first year after giving birth. Perinatal mood and anxiety disorders (PMADs) are the most common complication of pregnancy and childbirth. These disorders are more intense than the “baby blues,” which describes the common fatigue, sadness and worrying of new mothers after giving birth. Postpartum depression is the most common PMAD, but other examples include perinatal panic disorder, perinatal obsessive-compulsive disorder, postpartum posttraumatic stress disorder, perinatal bipolar disorder and postpartum psychosis.

 

Nearly one in five new mothers experience significant symptoms of postpartum depression and other PMADs. Common symptoms of mothers experiencing such disorders include anger, sadness, irritability, guilt, withdrawal from loved ones, feeling distant from the baby, anxiety and sometimes thoughts of harming the baby or herself. Symptoms may first present themselves during pregnancy as well as after childbirth.

 

North Shore Child & Family Guidance Center offers the Diane Goldberg Maternal Depression Program, which provides rapid response and diagnosis for mothers suffering from maternal postpartum depression and other perinatal mood and anxiety disorders. For more information about our services, please call us at 516-626-1971.

 

Related programs:

Diane Goldberg Maternal Depression Program

 

Read more in our blog:

When It’s More Than the Average Baby Blues

Postpartum and the Pandemic

Katherine’s Story: Healing from Postpartum Depression

Ask the Question

 

Sources:

CDC: Depression During and After Pregnancy

Postpartum VA: Perinatal Mood and Anxiety Disorders

Physical and Sexual Abuse

Physical and Sexual Abuse

 

Abuse and neglect can have a long-term impact on the well-being of children and teenagers. Common types of abuse include physical, sexual and emotional abuse, as well as neglect, which is a failure to meet a child’s basic physical and emotional needs.

 

Vital warning signs of abuse include withdrawal from friends or usual activities; behavior changes; depression; anxiety; apparent lack of supervision; frequent school absences; attempts at running away; reluctance to leave school activities; defiant behavior; and self-harm. Parents may be at a higher likelihood of becoming abusive if they have a history of being abused/neglected as a child, physical or mental illness, developmentally or physically disabled child, financial stress or unemployment, substance abuse issues or social isolation.

 

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, at least one in seven children have experienced some form of child abuse and/or neglect within the past year. In 2017, an estimated 1,720 children died from abuse or neglect. Abuse during childhood and adolescence can contribute to a higher risk of health issues in adulthood. Victims of child abuse are vulnerable to developing depression, addiction and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

 

It is crucial that child and adolescent victims of physical or sexual abuse seek mental health treatment. Mental health services are offered for children from birth through age 24 and their families at all three sites of North Shore Child & Family Guidance Center. These services include comprehensive evaluation, an individually tailored treatment plan that may include any combination of individual, family and group therapy, and, when indicated, medication management from a psychiatrist. All treatment plans require family consent and participation. For more information about our services, please call us at 516-626-1971.

 

National Resources:

Childhelp National Child Abuse Hotline: 1-800-422-4453

Prevent Child Abuse America: 1-800-CHILDREN (1-800-244-5373)

If in need of immediate medical attention, call 911.

 

Local Resource:

The Safe Center LI

 

Read more in our blog:

Keeping Teens Safe from Dating Violence and Abuse

 

Sources:

CDC: Preventing Child Abuse & Neglect

Mayo Clinic: Child Abuse – Symptoms and Causes

Childhelp: Child Abuse Statistics & Facts

School Refusal

School Refusal

School refusal is when a child or teenager refuses to go to school on a regular basis or has trouble staying in school. These students may complain of physical symptoms such as a headache or nausea, which often disappear if they are allowed to stay home. Younger children may throw tantrums or have meltdowns on school day mornings. School refusal can be incredibly frustrating and difficult for parents, and it could have long-term effects on the child’s social, emotional and academic development.

 

Often, school refusal is a sign of a larger problem with a child or teenager. School refusal may be in response to stressful life events or a fear of something at school, such as bullying or academic anxiety. About 2% to 5% of children refuse to attend school because of anxiety or depression. Younger children may suffer from separation anxiety contributing to school refusal.

 

Mental health services can assist with school refusal in children and teenagers. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), relaxation training and systemic desensitization can all help school-refusing students.

 

If your child is experiencing school refusal, mental health services at each of the three sites of the North Shore Child & Family Guidance Center can be incredibly helpful. These services include comprehensive evaluation, an individually tailored treatment plan that may include any combination of individual, family and group therapy, and, when indicated, medication management from a psychiatrist. All treatment plans require family consent and participation. For more information about our services, please call us at 516-626-1971.

 

Read more on our blog:

How to Handle School Refusal

 

Sources:

ADAA: School Refusal

Psychology Today: School Refusal

Self-Mutilation

Self-Mutilation

 

Self-mutilation refers to any form of intentional violence that can cause injury to the self, including cutting and suicide. Other forms of intentional self-injury may include head-banging, self-biting or self-scratching.

 

Adolescents have the highest rates of self-harm, with around 15% of teenagers reporting some form of self-injury. Some studies also note a higher rate among college students, in particular.

 

Children and adolescents with developmental disabilities are more likely to engage in acts of self-mutilation. Additionally, those with depression, anxiety and conduct disorders have a higher chance of self-mutilation and suicidal ideation. Though those who engage in non-suicidal self-injury don’t intend to complete suicide, it is possible that they could cause more harm than intended, resulting in medical complications or death.

 

Mental health services are offered for children from birth through age 24 and their families at all three sites of North Shore Child & Family Guidance Center. These services include comprehensive evaluation, an individually tailored treatment plan that may include any combination of individual, family and group therapy, and, when indicated, medication management from a psychiatrist. All treatment plans require family consent and participation. For more information about our services, please call us at 516-626-1971.

 

Sources:

CDC: Self-Directed Violence and Other Forms of Self-Injury

MHN: Self-injury (Cutting, Self-Harm or Self-Mutilation)

Separation and Divorce

Separation or Divorce

 

The separation or divorce of parents can be difficult for young children to cope with. Research has indicated that such events can contribute to problems in children and adolescents, including academic difficulties, behavioral issues, mental health symptoms such as depression and more.

 

Separation and divorce introduce a massive change to children regardless of their age. However, reactions may differ between children and adolescents. Young children may become uncooperative, aggressive or withdrawn. Older children and adolescents may feel a deep sadness or loss, and children of divorce may struggle with relationship and self-esteem problems into adulthood.

 

Mental health services are offered at all three of our sites. These services include comprehensive evaluation, an individually tailored treatment plan that may include any combination of individual, family and group therapy, and, when indicated, medication management from a psychiatrist. All treatment plans require family consent and participation. For more information about our services, please call us at 516-626-1971.

 

 

Read more in our blog:

Kids and Divorce

Holiday Tips for Divorced and Blended Families

 

Sources:

World Psychiatry: Parental divorce or separation

Psychology Today: The Impact of Divorce on Young Children and Adolescents

Suicide

Suicide

Suicide is the second leading cause of death for youth ages 15 to 24 years old and the third leading cause of death for youth ages 10 to 14 years old. The majority of youth who attempt suicide have a significant mental health condition, most frequently depression.

 

Warning signs of suicide may include talking or writing about suicide, mood swings, withdrawal from social contact, feeling hopeless, increased substance use, risky or self-destructive behavior, giving away belongings, changing normal routines and personality changes. Risk factors for suicide include a recent or serious loss, a psychiatric disorder, prior suicide attempts, substance abuse, family history of suicide, lack of social support and bullying.

 

With the Douglas S. Feldman Suicide Prevention Project, North Shore Child & Family  Guidance Center addresses high-risk cases with a thorough evaluation for suicide risk; multiple sessions of individual, group and family therapy each week; and an individualized, culturally sensitive treatment plan that focuses on safety strategies, healthy coping skills and relapse prevention. Evaluation with a psychiatrist regarding the possible use of medication will also be provided, when needed. We also provide in-home treatment and referrals to programs and services that will support your efforts to protect your child. Unlike many providers, the Guidance Center promises that at-risk children and teens will be seen within 24-48 hours, when the case is deemed urgent.

 

The Fay J. Lindner Foundation Triage and Emergency Services at North Shore Child & Family Guidance Center offers rapid response to psychiatric emergencies – a sudden set of circumstances in which there is an impending risk of danger to the child or adolescent such as a risk of suicide, risk of physical harm to others, and a state of seriously impaired judgment in which the child is endangered. Our team will assess if the situation is urgent and will arrange an appointment to see the child within 24 to 48 hours.

 

Our goal is to strengthen, stabilize and support. For more information about our services, please call us at 516-626-1971.

 

Related Programs:

The Douglas S. Feldman Suicide Prevention Project

Fay J. Lindner Foundation Triage and Emergency Services

 

National Resources:

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (United States): 1-800-273-8255

Crisis Text Line: Text “HOME” to 741741

In an emergency situation, call 911.

 

Read more on our blog:

Suicidal Thinking in Young People: Know the Signs

Recognizing the Risk of Suicide

Guidance Center Expands Suicide Prevention Efforts

 

Sources:

AACAP: Teen Suicide

Child Mind: Teen Suicide Risk Factors

Teenage Pregnancy

Teenage Pregnancy

 

In 2017, nearly 200,000 babies were born to teenage mothers. Teenage pregnancies can be incredibly stressful, and the majority of them are unplanned. The experience thrusts a teenage woman into the position of independent adult now responsible for another human life. Many struggle in school as a result, with only around half of teenage mothers receiving a high school diploma by age 22.

 

In the past decade, the rate of teenage pregnancy (for girls and women ages 15 to 19 years old) in the United States has reached a record low. This decrease has been seen across racial and ethnic groups. However, racial and ethnic disparities remain apparent among teenage pregnancies, with the pregnancy rate among Hispanic and non-Hispanic Black teenagers more than twice that of non-Hispanic white teenagers.

 

Teenage pregnancies involve an immense amount of added stress, and they can often contribute to higher rates of mental health conditions. Teenage mothers are twice as likely to experience postpartum depressioncompared to adult mothers. These teenagers also have higher rates of suicidal thoughts and are more likely to experience symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

 

At North Shore Child & Family Guidance Center, our Good Beginnings for Babies program provides support, counseling, and advocacy for pregnant and parenting teens at the Leeds Place – Serving Young People, our Westbury office. For more information about our services, please call us at 516-626-1971.

 

Related Programs:

Good Beginnings for Babies

 

Sources:

CDC – About Teen Pregnancy

Healthline – Teen Pregnancy

Trauma Witness and Victim of Violence

Trauma Witness and Victim of Violence

 

The National Child Traumatic Stress Network defines a traumatic event as a “frightening, dangerous or violent event that poses a threat to a child’s life or bodily integrity.” Potential traumatic experiences can include abuse (physical, sexual, or emotional), neglect, natural disasters, acts of terrorism, family or community violence, sudden or violent loss of a loved one, substance use disorder (personal or familiar), war experiences, serious accidents or life-threatening illness, and military family-related stressors.

 

Though traumatic responses in children and adolescents can range widely, some common responses include depressive symptoms or anxiety, behavioral changes, attention and academic difficulties, regression, difficulty in relationships, physical symptoms such as aches and pains, substance use and risky behavior. Research has indicated that childhood exposure to traumatic events can lead to long-term health problems and premature death.

 

Domestic and dating violence among teenagers is a troublingly common issue in the United States. Teen dating violence may include physical violence, sexual violence, psychological aggression or stalking. Nearly one in 11 female and one in 15 male high school students reported experiencing physical dating violence in the past year. One in 9 female and one in 36 males reported experiencing sexual dating violence in the past year. Youth victims of dating violence are more likely to experience depression and anxiety, engage in risky or unhealthy behaviors, exhibit antisocial behaviors and contemplate suicide.

 

With the Douglas S. Feldman Suicide Prevention Project, North Shore Child & Family  Guidance Center addresses high-risk cases with a thorough evaluation for suicide risk; multiple sessions of individual, group and family therapy each week; and an individualized, culturally sensitive treatment plan that focuses on safety strategies, healthy coping skills and relapse prevention. Evaluation with a psychiatrist regarding the possible use of medication will also be provided, when needed. We also provide in-home treatment and referrals to programs and services that will support your efforts to protect your child. Unlike many providers, the Guidance Center promises that at-risk children and teens will be seen within 24-48 hours, when the case is deemed urgent.

 

The Fay J. Lindner Foundation Triage and Emergency Services at North Shore Child & Family Guidance Center offers rapid response to psychiatric emergencies – a sudden set of circumstances in which there is an impending risk of danger to the child or adolescent such as a risk of suicide, risk of physical harm to others, and a state of seriously impaired judgment in which the child is endangered, and situations of risk to a defenseless victim involving abuse, neglect, or exposure to domestic violence. Our team will assess if the situation is urgent and will arrange an appointment to see the child within 24 to 48 hours. Our goal is to strengthen, stabilize, and support. For more information about our services, please call us at 516-626-1971.

 

Read more on our blog:

Healing Childhood Trauma

Keeping Teens Safe from Dating Violence and Abuse

Knowing the Signs of Teen Dating Violence

 

Sources:

NCTSN: About Child Trauma

CDC: Preventing Teen Dating Violence

Youth at Risk

Youth at Risk

 

Youth at risk serves as an umbrella term for a range of circumstances that place young people at greater vulnerability for problem behaviors, such as substance abuse, school failure, and juvenile delinquency, along with mental health disorders such as depression and anxiety.

 

North Shore Child & Family Guidance Center offers a wide range of services for youth at risk. Clinical Care Coordination Teams (CCCT) provide home-based clinical services for troubled children and adolescents. Coordinated Children’s Services Initiative (CCSI) coordinates services among multiple systems to prevent children and adolescents from falling through the cracks. Family Peer Support Services,  also known as Family Advocates, provides parent-to-parent support both individually and/or in groups to families who have children experiencing social, emotional and/or behavioral challenges in their home, school or community.

 

Mental health services are offered for children from birth through age 24 and their families at all three sites of North Shore Child & Family Guidance Center. These services include comprehensive evaluation, an individually tailored treatment plan that may include any combination of individual, family, and group therapy, and, when indicated, medication management from a psychiatrist. All treatment plans require family consent and participation. For more information about our services, please call us at 516-626-1971.

 

Related Programs:

Clinical Care Coordination Team (CCCT)

Coordinated Children’s Services Initiative (CCSI)

Family Peer Support Services